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Emergency Help

We can’t be there in person to help and support you in a moment of crisis, but there are other options available to you if you can’t turn to someone you trust. By giving us your postcode (or one nearby to where you are right now) we can let you know about services in your area. Remember: this moment will pass; you won’t always feel the way you do right now. 

If in doubt always call 999.

You can also sign up to Alumina, our online support for mental health and wellbeing here: 

https://www.selfharm.co.uk/alu...

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My Dad

Happy Father's Day! Check out this poem by Lindsay MacRae titled 'My Dad'. Celebrate everything that makes your dad your dad...

Neck nuzzling
 Crossword puzzling
  Ear picking
   Towel flicking
    Mum snogging
     Bog hogging
      Loud snoring
       Can be boring
        Silly laughing
         Aaarf aarfing 
          Shopping getting
           List forgetting
            Football playing
             Chore delaying
              Slightly greying

                    DAD!

Taken from the book How to Avoid Kissing your Parents in Public by Lindsay MacRae, p2.

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Marmite Thinking

Have you ever heard of the phrase 'all or nothing' before?

This basically means when you're either completely decided on something, or completely against it. For example, we sometimes say that you can be either all or nothing with marmite - meaning, you either really love it, or really hate it!

'All-or-nothing thinking' means when you pretty much only think in extremes. This can have quite a serious effect on your day to day decision making, as well as how you feel about yourself and how you think your life is going. If we only ever think that things can be really good, or really bad, this can end up causing emotions such as anger and disappointment when things don't go our way, which can lead to longer term mental health conditions such as anxiety or depression.

Using words like 'nothing' or 'never' often, are common symptoms of all-or-nothing thinking. When we don't weigh up the evidence we have for and against our thoughts, and decide there are no alternatives or solutions to our problems, we only open ourselves up to experience the negatives of a particular situation. 

Here are some tips to ensure you avoid all-or-nothing thinking as often as you can, and what you can do instead:

💭 Try to stop using words like 'nothing' or 'ever'

💭 Notice when you're thinking in marmite terms (either loving it or hating it) and ask yourself if there's a possibility for any gray area in between

💭 Try to find the positive side of the situation

💭 Recognise your strengths and don't focus on your faults

💭 Understand that setbacks happen and don't dwell on self-defeating thoughts

Always remember that sharing problems and things you struggle with means you are more likely to solve them. Another person might bring a different view or solution.

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#volunteersweek

Giving things away can make us feel good!

It is proven that giving something away does actually have a positive effect on our mental health!

Think about it: when you have spent ages thinking about a present a person will love and then they open it, how do you feel?

It feels good doesn’t it? We often feel pleased with ourselves – at the work we put into buying it, the time we took wrapping it and then the expression of joy on the person receiving the gift's face!

Giving away our time (otherwise known as volunteering) is exactly the same...

Here are some of the ways volunteering can help us:

🏅 We make new friends

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🏅 We overcome personal struggles (learning new skills, being in a new social situations)

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🏅 It’s better than paid work because we can be more picky choosing to volunteer in an area we enjoy most!

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🏅 We add to our CV and work experience;

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🏅 We get to have FUN! 

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On average people in the UK volunteer for 11 hours a month; that’s less than 3 hours out of your busy week to...

  • Volunteer at the cat shelter
  • Litter pick in your local park
  • Volunteer at the Old People’s home
  • Arrange a school climate change group to tackle how school can develop an Eco school
  • Help out at the local kids club or music group
  • Take your elderly neighbours’ dog for a walk
  • Do the filing for a local charity 

When you're looking for volunteer opportunities, remember to look for something that...

  • You enjoy
  • That pushes you a little, but not makes you feel uncomfortable
  • That you can commit to
  • That helps you make friends with people you might not otherwise get to know
  • That is about things that motivate you!

Enjoy volunteering over the summer break: you certainly won’t get bored! 

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My Dad

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